The ESOP Association Blog

Covering ESOPs and employee ownership

Employee Ownership Foundation – Charles R. Edmunson Scholarships

FoundationThe Employee Ownership Foundation is accepting applications for the 2014 Charles R. Edmunson Scholarships. Information is available on the Employee Ownership Foundation website. The deadline for all 2014 Edmunson Scholarship Application is March 7, 2014.

This Scholarship program honors employee ownership leader and advocate Charles R. Edmunson who dedicated a significant part of his life to educating employee owners of the benefits of widespread ownership in a free enterprise system. Mr. Edmunson was also instrumental in the creation of the Employee Ownership Foundation.

An Edmunson Scholarship awards an ESOP employer up to $1,250 to defray the expense of sending employee owners to employee ownership training programs such as the Employee Ownership Foundation’s Employee Owner Retreat or the Association’s Annual Conference in Washington, DC. The Scholarship may also be used for Association Chapter and Regional Conferences. The Scholarship is for non-managerial employee owners.

Filed under: Employee Ownership Foundation, ,

Thoughts on the Leading in an Ownership Setting Program

Foundation

We wanted to highlight this guest post from Dave Ferraro of Carris Reels who shares a few thoughts on his experience at the Leading in an Ownership Setting Program. More information about the program is here. 

Leading in an Ownership Setting – A Participant’s First-Hand Experience.

By Dave Ferraro, Carris Reels, Proctor, VT

Eighteen months before our current CEO had planned to retire, I was tapped as the next CEO of Carris Reels, 1 100% ESOP company headquartered in Proctor, Vermont. At the time I have spent 33 years in the sales and marketing side of the business. As we discussed the possibility of my assuming the CEO role, I became deeply aware of the enormity of the responsibility that went with the position. On the recommendation of the CEO I was succeeding who had attended an earlier program, I signed up for the Penn ESOP CEO Leadership Development Program.

Seventeen of us arrived on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania one Sunday in late June to begin the program. Our self introductions were stiff, our apprehension was apparent, and the tension in the room was palpable. Yet after the first day, between a well-planned exercise and break outs into smaller groups, the group opened up, people relaxed, conversation flowed, and humor ensued – the class was engaged.

Later in the week, we would realize we had only scratched the surface of the trust, sincerity and frank discussions that would follow. Our facilitator had the pleasure of telling us that we were to disconnect from our electronic communication tools for the week as much as we possibly could so that we could focus on our work together, and we did. For 8 days over two sessions, this group met at 7:30, remained in the meeting room where lunch was served, took 30 minutes out before dinner together and then returned to our rooms to do some ‘homework’ to prepare for the next day. The result was that we grew together in many ways.

I want to touch on just a few of the gifts I gained from these sessions.

The content and agenda for the program was well-planned and targeted to what we would find useful as ESOP company leaders. The credentialed presenters, people with faculty experience at Penn, had relevant building blocks, much of which we’d later debate and mold into something that we could use in our respective companies.

Dr. Michael Baime, Director of the Mindfulness Center at Penn’s School of Medicine, conducted an impressionable session on mindfulness. He had the room captive as he spoke. However, you probably can imagine the looks around the room when he said – ‘OK we’re going to meditate.’ More than a few eyes rolled, but we tried it. 45 minutes later I heard remarks like – ‘wow, I’ve never been THERE before’ and ‘I think I found my happy place.’ We learned the importance of mindfulness in being fully aware of ourselves and those around us so that we could listen more effectively and be better attuned to our responses to people and situations.

It is just this type of experiential learning that resonated. The depth and relevance of data and research presented by other faculty provided fresh concepts to bring back to our companies.

The class was composed of 9 current CEO’s and 8 people who would be incoming CEOs sometime in the next couple of years. We shared key successes and mistakes – which is second best to experiencing them oneself. The real world learning was so much deeper that what you could ever expect from a class, a course or even a good read. The integration of our personal experience with the material presented throughout the program was one of the real highlights of our learning.

As participants, we had open and honest exchanges around philosophies, practices and failures of 17 company leaders that seeded our minds with experience. So many other classroom-based programs or seminars are taught from the perspective of academia, that they aren’t really useful in practice. This program was different. It really was directed at giving us concepts, research and ideas and then having us talk through with one another how the ideas applied or could apply to building the culture in our company.

There was one overwhelming theme woven through the program – CULTURE IS EVERYTHING. So what is it that makes a culture strong? By the end of session 2, we departed with the 5 key elements to further culture; 1)clarity of vision 2)passion for vision/mission/company 3) communication and transparency 4) focused attention, and, 5) alignment.

The program design included frequent small group breakout sessions of 3 – 4 people which provided a forum of thinking through application with trusted peers. Our interaction opened a door for subsequent provocative inner reflection. As full as our days and evenings were, all admitted to spending time with their notes following dinner each evening.

One of the days the program included an out-of-classroom experience participating in Philadelphia’s extensive Mural Arts program. The program founder, Jane Golden, first shared the profound story of how, through her passion, she orchestrated the funding and creation by community artists and residents of more than 3000 murals in some of the poorest sections of Philadelphia. Her inspiration has generated pride and participation in communities where hope was just a dream. We had the pleasure to work on a mural as a group (some said we painted but the local artists said that was kind). Some of these murals occupy 4-6 story buildings and take months to complete. They’ve reduced crime and drug activity in some communities as residents recognize what they can accomplish with a little encouragement.

Our program facilitators kept us busy as well between the two sessions at Penn. We each visited at least 2 other companies of other participants to observe their company’s culture. We looked for the answers to questions such as:

  • How do employee owners have a voice?
  • What do you see that tells you what is important in the culture?
  • How do employee owners act like co-owners of the company?
  • What ownership structures and committees exist?
  • How do the leaders maintain, reinforce or strengthen culture?

We had three program participants visit Carris. The unexpected surprise was the value of the learning that occurred for our own employee owners as a result of talking to our visitors about their respective companies. Their discussion afforded an important reference point that could serve as a benchmark for us. In the second session at Penn (four months after the first session) we shared what we had learned from our visits. This discussion was very revealing, in that some things we each had taken for granted were recognized as best practices. At the same time the entire classroom was taking copious notes of collective observations and ideas that they could investigate further with individual leaders whose company they may not have had a chance to visit.

While you can’t take someone else’s culture wholesale and drop it into your company, you can take pieces and modify them to fit in your culture to reinforce or model specific values. Just as we learned, culture is not a unrelated set of disconnected parts, but rather a set of practices, policies, and structures that are aligned to develop and reinforce an articulated set of values and behaviors that connect to the concept of shared ownership.

Despite a well-planned agenda and set of faculty presentations, it was often the space left for “emerging topics” where some of the more relevant content came to the surface. One day we had a session where the group initially divided into those who had been in the CEO role for more than 2 or 3 years and those who were new to the role or not yet in the role. Then the two groups came together in a circle so that the new CEOs or CEOs-to-be could question the experienced CEO’s about what they had learned and what they might do differently as they entered the CEO role. The take-aways from this 90 minute discussion have proven invaluable to me as I am about to take up my new position as CEO.

The first day of session two, we were given a tough assignment. We had to write a tribute to OURSELVES as we would like it to be at our future retirement:

Tonight hundreds of people will gather to honor you as The Employee-owned Company Leader of the Year. People will praise your character, performance, accomplishments, passions, frustrations.

The groans were deafening as the assignment was made (pity the instructor). For the next three days we’d ask one another, “Have you started yet?” When Day 4 arrived, everyone was watching the clock hoping we’d run out of time – but our ‘taskmaster’ would not have it. With a big smile she said those dreaded words: ‘it’s time for your tributes’! We had one individual who had been outspoken and full of humor throughout our time together. He volunteered to go first. He began by getting up and passing a box of tissues around the table for any tears he knew were imminent. Next he opened his Ipad and started to read his self-tribute as the theme from Rocky began playing in the background. That was the icebreaker we needed. These tributes were another example of opening oneself amidst a group of authentic and caring ESOP company leaders who are driven to make their companies the best.

Looking back – calling this “a class” is misleading –it’s more like 8 days of immersion into a veteran ownership pool of CEOs and soon-to-bes. People committed to the same ends, sharing common challenges, opportunities and strategies.

So, what did I gain from spending the extensive and intensive time in this program?

1. A Network. First, I developed a network of 16 other people I can pick up the phone and ask ANY, and I mean ANY, question about their business, their ESOP or to gain their input on my plans. They know they can do the same with me. Though the formal program ended, the learning has continued. I visited another company later in the year on my own and have had calls and meetings with others in the program when we have been able to get together.

2. Succession. I am moving into the CEO role at the beginning of this year. I am committed to using my own style to effect change as a leader, rather than trying to become the people who have had the role before me.

3. A plan. The program helped me to develop a roadmap for what I want to accomplish as the CEO of Carris. I know there will be many secondary roads and detours. However, I discovered how to avoid many of the potential potholes along the way and I am aware of the many stops I will need to take to check whether our culture is developing the way we want it to.

I cannot imagine a better preparation for soon to be CEO’s than being a participant in Leading in an Ownership Setting.

Filed under: Employee Ownership Foundation, , , ,

Leading in an Ownership Setting: The Program for CEOs — 2014 Sessions Announced

Foundation

The Employee Ownership Foundation and the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice offer CEOs/Presidents and/or the CEO/President designee, of ESOP companies a breakthrough Certificate Program — Leading in an Ownership Setting: The Program for CEOs. More information about the program here.

This ESOP Leadership program is focused on enhancing each participant’s leadership effectiveness in his or her own company.

Session Dates:

Session I: June 15 – 20, 2014

Session II: October 19 – 22, 2014

Gettysburg Tour: June 21, 2014 (Optional Leadership Lessons Tour at Gettysburg)

Tuition:

$11,000 (ESOP Association Members); $13,000 (Non-Members)

The program will cover the following topics:

  • Essential factors for effectively leading an ESOP company
  • Leadership challenges & opportunities unique to ESOPs
  • Link of ownership culture to ESOP company performance
  • The leader’s role in promoting employee engagement
  • Reflection on your personal strengths and challenges as a leader
  • Connecting your values and beliefs with your role as a leader
  • 360 feedback using a nationally normed survey
  • Two coaching sessions with an experienced executive coach
  • Strategies for building a high performance ownership culture
  • Leading change in your organization
  • Research findings related to ESOPs & firm performance
  • Cutting edge concepts, tools and techniques in leadership
  • Development of a peer network of ESOP company leaders

Who should attend? CEOs, Presidents, and CEO/President formal designees, or other designated functional leader of the company.

Within these role definitions, this program is designed for leaders who:

  • Want to enhance their leadership effectiveness
  • Practice and are committed to lifelong learning
  • Want to build a high-performance ownership culture
  • Want to engage with a national network of peers

Why should I attend?

  • To have the time to reflect on your leadership strengths and impact
  • To become more aware of effectively driving your leadership agenda
  • To learn about new leadership tools for strengthening your effectiveness
  • To gain skills for increasing your team’s effectiveness
  • To enhance your ability to coach team members
  • To create a more coherent plan for building your firm’s culture
  • To maximize the performance opportunity of employee ownership
  • To strengthen your firm’s succession system to sustain your company

Location: The Certificate Program will be held on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania.  One of the most beautiful of the Ivy League institutions with green lawns, landmark architecture, a rich “university city” cultural life, and all of Penn’s 12 graduate and professional schools within walking distance of one another.

Questions about registration for this prestigious program please contact Rosemary Clements at rose AT esopassociation.org or 202-293-2971. For more information about program content, contact Ginny Vanderslice, at virginiv AT sas.upenn.edu or 215-292-4865.

Filed under: Employee Ownership Foundation, , ,

Thoughts on a New Book, The Citizen’s Share

Review of the new book, The Citizen’s Share: Putting Ownership Back Into Democracy

As reviewed by: Joseph Cabral, Immediate Past Chair of the Employee Ownership Foundation, Thousand Oaks, CA

Editor’s Note: Book reviews are not a regular feature of ESOP Association publications or social media.This article originally ran in the January 2014 issue of the ESOP Report, the newsletter of The ESOP Association. We are sharing the following information as a service to members of the ESOP community.

IMG_1201As Chair of The ESOP Association at the turn of the millennium, I called for The Great National Debate on Employee Ownership. The second year of my term, the debate talk disappeared as we defended employee ownership in the wake of Enron, Worldcom, and United Airlines. Although the problems with these companies were not the result of broad-based employee ownership, the inclusion of employee ownership made it difficult to overcome the argument that employee ownership was somehow involved in the failure.

The opportunity to advance employee ownership was given another chance when in 2002 President George W. Bush proclaimed his belief in an Ownership Society. The ESOP community was excited at the prospect of the President endorsing the idea of an Ownership Society and just as quickly disappointed when he restricted the definition to home ownership.

A new book, The Citizen’s Share, opens up yet another opportunity to debate the ownership issue. Authors, Professors Joseph R. Blasi, Richard B. Freeman, and Douglas L. Kruse, provide readers with the foundation to have the Great National Debate on Employee Ownership. The authors themselves seem to desire such a debate as they write, “Following American thinking about broad-based ownership and having a citizen’s share in society from the 18th to the current Century can, we believe, help us develop a road map to increase the citizen’s share of our economy. That is the purpose of this book.”

The authors take us on a journey through American history starting with the Founding Fathers, through the Industrial Revolution, to today’s information age. The authors provide documents, speeches, and quotes from our Founding Fathers warning readers of the consequences if wealth producing property is not distributed fairly. The country was founded by people escaping their homeland’s aristocracy that choked opportunity for upward mobility and the accumulation of wealth. Inherited wealth and power was the societal norm. What they sought was a land where freedom and liberty could be the principles for the founding of the country.

The authors follow the agricultural roots where most people could create wealth by farming their land and the beginnings of the industrial age, when cod fishermen participated in profit sharing associated with their catch, to the Louisiana Purchase, which added sufficient land for the new citizens to own, to companies that provided profit sharing and share ownership to employees in the industrial, and now, information age.

Today, we are concerned about the unsustainability of the current system. The public generally take exception to the current outcome but seem to have accepted, “the rich get richer and the poor get poorer,” as inherent to the capitalistic system.

The authors point us to a series of questions on the General Social Survey that are specific to broad-based ownership (the series of questions was supported by funding from the Employee Ownership Foundation) for a counterpoint to the conventional wisdom that shared ownership is insignificant in our society. The authors note the study discloses that “about 47% of private-sector full-time wage and salary workers have some form of shared ownership in small amounts, except for ESOPs, in the firms where they work.” Such ownership takes the form of profit sharing, gain sharing, as well as ESOPs. Thus, shared ownership is indeed a significant part of our society and there is a need to expand shares and expand the level of wealth they represent.

Our ESOP community knows the outcome of our capitalistic society does not have to result in greater concentration of wealth. In fact, ESOPs stand as testimony that broad-based ownership of wealth creates greater wealth in our nation and shares that wealth more fairly among those who helped create the wealth, making us all capitalists.

The authors cite a late 19th Century congregational pastor, William Gladden, who addressing rising tensions over wealth inequality and horrible working conditions suggested the solution was what he called cooperation, “by making the laborer his own capitalist.” Those of us in the ESOP community understand the impact of employee ownership through ESOPs and The Citizen’s Share provides us with the evidence, arguments, and historical material to rebut our naysayers. Now is the time to make our ESOP voices heard by not just our fellow ESOPers but by the public-at-large.

The Citizens Share is a must read for all in the employee ownership community and the rest of the American public. Read it and pass it on to all you know. If we all make sharing our ESOP story a priority, we can make a difference and make our nation a more just and economically fair society.

For information on where to purchase a copy of The Citizen’s Share, click here.

The Citizen’s Share: Putting Ownership Back Into Democracy, authored by Joseph R. Blasi, Richard B. Freeman, and Douglas L. Kruse, published by Yale University Press, ISBN: 978-0-300-19225-4.

Filed under: Employee Ownership Foundation, Member Services, , , ,

2014 Edmunson Scholarships

Foundation

The Employee Ownership Foundation will be accepting applications for the 2014 Charles R. Edmunson Scholarships.

2014 Edmunson Introduction Letter

2014 Edmunson Application

2014 Edmunson Terms & Conditions

This Scholarship program honors employee ownership leader and advocate Charles R. Edmunson who dedicated a significant part of his life to educating employee owners of the benefits of widespread ownership in a free enterprise system. Mr. Edmunson was also instrumental in the creation of the Employee Ownership Foundation.

An Edmunson Scholarship awards an ESOP employer up to $1,250 to defray the expense of sending employee owners to employee ownership training programs such as the Employee Ownership Foundation’s Employee Owner Retreat or the Association Annual Conference in Washington, DC. The Scholarship may also be used for Association Chapter and Regional Conferences. The Scholarship is for non-managerial employee owners.

Filed under: Employee Ownership Foundation, TEA Members, ,

Employee Ownership Foundation Ends 2013 on a High Note

FoundationAt the 2013 Las Vegas Conference & Trade Show held in November, the Employee Ownership Foundation raised approximately $100,000 ensuring that employee ownership research and Foundation programs will not only continue but thrive in 2014.

“Once more, we are impressed by the incredible generosity of the ESOP community,” stated Employee Ownership Foundation President, J. Michael Keeling. “Thank you to everyone who donated both time and effort to the Employee Ownership Foundation in 2013.”

To add to the excitement, the Employee Ownership Foundation held a book signing at the Conference. (More info in the November 2013 ESOP Report issue, page 1.) On November 7, 2013, Professor Joseph R. Blasi, a preeminent scholar in the field of employee ownership, J. Robert Beyster Professor, and sociologist at the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers University, spoke to Conference attendees about the roots of employee ownership in America’s history. Following his presentation, he met with attendees at the Foundation booth to sign copies of his newly released book: The Citizen’s Share: Putting Ownership Back into Democracy. He co-authored the new book with Richard B. Freeman (Herbert Ascherman Professor of Economics at Harvard University) and Douglas L. Kruse (Professor of Industrial Relations and Human Resources and an economist at the School of Management and Labor Relations, Rutgers University). The Citizen’s Share was released on November 26, 2013. Additional information about the book can be found on the book’s website.

IMG_1201Individuals who donated over $100 to the Employee Ownership Foundation in 2013 are eligible to receive a copy of the book. For more information, please contact Gwenn Rosenthal at gwenn AT esopassociation.org.

Don’t forget, donations to the Employee Ownership Foundation are tax deductible; contributions must be received by the Foundation before year-end 2013 to qualify. For additional information about the Foundation, or to donate, please visit the website.

Filed under: Conference Information, Employee Ownership Foundation, Employee Ownership Message, , ,

Links of Interest

We came across of few interesting articles recently and thought we’d share.

An article in the Des Moines Register talking about Iowa’s state ESOP program

A roundup of book reviews for The Citizen’s Share: Putting Ownership Back into Democracy:

The Citizen’s Share: Putting Ownership Back into Democracy by co-authors Joseph R. Blasi, Douglas L. Kruse, and Richard B. Freeman was recently reviewed by the PBS News Hour Business Blog: What the Founding Fathers Believed: Stock Ownership for All

As a means of background, one of the book’s authors, Dr. Blasi, spoke to attendees of the Association’s 2013 Las Vegas Conference & Trade Show, and following his presentation, signed copies of the book. The Citizen’s Share is a history of the employee ownership movement, starting with the American Revolution, continuing through America’s first Presidential term with George Washington, and covering the first major piece of legislation regarding stock ownership. The book also discusses the involvement of several more U.S. Presidents and notable historical figures, including John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln. More information about the book and links to purchase.

A review of the book was featured in Time: Can Employee-Owned Companies Reboot the Economy? by Christopher Matthews

The Economist also had a review: Free exchange – Turning workers into capitalists

Filed under: Employee Ownership Foundation, Employee Ownership Message, Government Affairs, , ,

Employee Ownership Keeps Moving Forward

On this blog in July 2012, we talked about Judson T. Bradford of the W.J. Bradford Paper Company, now the Bradford Company, located in Holland, MI. Mr. Bradford began his ESOP journey in the 1950s and for well over 30+ years championed the ESOP cause among local and national leaders which led to the introduction of what is probably the first pro-employee ownership bill in Congress and helped to get employee ownership on the 1968 Republican Party platform. In 2003, the ESOP Report covered Mr. Bradford’s work in this article.

“Saying that Judson is an unsung hero of the ESOP cause is an understatement,” said ESOP Association President, J. Michael Keeling. “Without people like him, who saw and understood the vision of the ESOP’s founder, Louis Kelso, the concept of employee ownership wouldn’t be the same today.”

Some of Mr. Bradford’s letters and work surrounding ESOPs was covered in this blog post from July 2012.  The notebook Mr. Bradford shared with the Association in 2003 is full of letters to several notable individuals including President Gerald Ford, Michigan Governor George Romney, father of the 2012 Republican Nominee for President, Mitt Romney, Jacob Javits and Guy Vander Jagt, prominent members of Congress at the time. It also contains information on speeches and the first bill introduced in the U.S. Congress that supported the concept of broadened employee ownership. It’s worth a look and it’s an amazing story documented by a man with a belief in the movement.

As it turns out, Mr. Bradford is still working to further the ESOP cause. Michael Keeling recently had the opportunity to speak with Mr. Bradford who told Mr. Keeling about his efforts to include the concept of broad-based employee ownership in the academic world. He is urging the leadership of GVSU, Michigan’s Grand Valley State University, to focus on the growing body of knowledge about employee ownership. Work the Employee Ownership Foundation is doing as well to encourage the teaching of broad-based ownership in the academic world.

“It really is wonderful to know that he is still working for our cause. We have some very deep roots in our ESOP community and we’re moving forward every day,” stated Keeling. “Judson’s dedication to broad-based ownership is on par with leaders such as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, James Madison, Russell Long, and Louis Kelso, among many others that have been discussed in the new book called The Citizen’s Share which talks about the history of the employee ownership movement.”

The Citizen’s Share: Putting Ownership Back into Democracy was released by Yale University Press on November 26, 2013 and is co-authored by Joseph R. Blasi, Douglas L. Kruse, and Richard B. Freeman. More information about the book can be found here.

Filed under: Employee Ownership Foundation, Employee Ownership Message, , ,

November Wrap-Up

Now that we’re moving into the last month of 2013, we thought we’d share a few links from November and wish everyone a safe and Happy Thanksgiving holiday.

2013 Las Vegas Conference & Trade Show links:

Visit the Employee Ownership Foundation

LinkedIn Link Up

Stop by the Membership Services Booth and say hello!

Employee Ownership Foundation Lunch

ESOP Association Lunch

2014 AACE Awards Program Changes

ESOP Association News: Justice Department Asks Supreme Court to Reverse Circuit Courts’ Pro-ESOP Position

The November 2013 ESOP Report is Available

Foundation News: Passionate Speech by Preeminent Scholar of Employee Ownership Ignites Crowd at 2013 Las Vegas Conference

2014 AACE Awards Brochure Available

2014 Educational Programs Announced

Tired of Reading It; Tired of Hearing It

Tax Reform & ESOPs — Saving ESOPs, Saving Our ESOPs, Saving YOUR ESOP

Filed under: AACE - Annual Awards for Communications Excellence, Conference Information, Employee Ownership Foundation, Employee Ownership Message, Government Affairs, Member Services, Publication, , ,

FOUNDATION NEWS Passionate Speech by Preeminent Scholar of Employee Ownership Ignites Crowd at 2013 Las Vegas Conference

Blasi Vegas Book Signing 2On Thursday, November 7, 2013, Professor Joseph R. Blasi, a preeminent scholar in the field of employee ownership, J. Robert Beyster Professor, and sociologist at the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers University, spoke to Conference attendees about the roots of employee ownership in America’s history.

Dr. Blasi spent two years researching his new book, The Citizen’s Share: Putting Ownership Back into Democracy, which he co-authored with Richard B. Freeman (Herbert Ascherman Professor of Economics at Harvard University) and Douglas L. Kruse (Professor of Industrial Relations and Human Resources and an economist at the School of Management and Labor Relations, Rutgers University). During his presentation, he shared his thoughts and discoveries that went into the new book. Starting with the American Revolution, continuing through America’s first Presidential term with George Washington, the cod fishing industry — which was a pioneer in the advancement of average paid employees having a share of their efforts as a condition of a Federal government bailout — and covered the first major piece of legislation regarding stock ownership in America. He also talked about the involvement of several more US Presidents and notable historical figures, including John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln. Dr. Blasi left a room of 1,000 plus listeners, and employee ownership enthusiasts, entranced.

“If you missed Dr. Blasi’s speech, you missed an education,” said ESOP Association President, J. Michael Keeling. “The information he shared was invaluable to our employee Blasi Vegas Book Signing 3ownership cause. The history of the employee ownership movement is something all of us in this community should be aware of.”

Dr. Blasi’s new book, which covers the history of the employee stock ownership movement, will be available from Yale University Press on November 26, 2013; Kindle editions are now available as well as sample chapters on audio and other devices. The Employee Ownership Foundation will provide a copy of the book to anyone making a $100 contribution to the Foundation, with a limit of five books. Many of the Las Vegas Conference attendees did make contributions and received books. Many said they would give the book to their Representative and Senators.

Additional information about the book can be found on the Yale University Press website.

According to the Yale University Press: “The idea of workers owning the businesses where they work is not new. In America’s early years, Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison believed that the best economic plan for the Republic was for citizens to have some ownership stake in the land, which was the main form of productive capital. This book traces the development of that share idea in American history and brings its message to today’s economy, where business capital has replaced land as the source of wealth creation. Based on a ten-year study of profit sharing and employee ownership at small and large corporations, this important and insightful work makes the case that the Founders’ original vision of sharing ownership and profits offers a viable path toward restoring the middle class. Blasi, Freeman, and Kruse show that an ownership stake in a corporation inspires and increases worker loyalty, productivity, and innovation. Their book offers history-, economics-, and evidence-based policy ideas at their best.”

Blasi Vegas Book Signing 1The December 2013 issue of the ESOP Report will feature additional information about the book, including a review.

“While many of us think we know the history of employee ownership, what we all need is a larger education, larger view, and larger historical perspective on how it all began to understand where it’s going,” said J. Michael Keeling. “Dr. Blasi takes the issue of employee ownership, and from reading his work, one knows just how passionately he feels about it, and makes it very accessible.”

Filed under: Employee Ownership Foundation, Employee Ownership Message, , , , , , , ,

Welcome to the employee ownership blog of The ESOP Association.
The place where you'll find the latest information on ESOPs and employee ownership news.
Serving the entire ESOP community.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 88 other followers

Proudly Celebrating the ESOP Fiduciary Insurance Member Program

Flickr Stream

2014 Annual Conference in Washington DC

More Photos
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 88 other followers