The Ownership Infection

What if the spirit of employee ownership was like a virus, something that could be caught and transmitted to the next person you talk to?

What if it already is?

Amy Kirby is an employee owner at DCS Corporation. Last year she wrote an impressive letter nominating one of the people on her staff, Karla Langhus, to be The ESOP Association’s Employee Owner of the Year. Langhus, the chair of the DCS ESOP Communications Committee, won the award.

Ask Langhus about the remarkable list of accomplishments detailed in Kirby’s letter, and she credits Kirby for supporting her work as committee chair. “If it weren’t for her, it would never have gotten done,” says Langhus.

Langus also points out how well she and Kirby work together in their daily roles. Kirby, says Langhus, often acts like a partner, someone with whom she can bounce around ideas and work with to solve problems.

Langhus’ accomplishments clearly are the result of energy and hard work. Why does she put so much into the job of helping co-workers understand the ESOP? What does she get out of it?

“I get to do what I want to do,” says Langhus.

Taking ownership is important to Langhus. And she recognizes that it is important to others as well, so she makes sure committee members have autonomy and can make the projects they tackle their own. “I leave it to each committee member to figure out what will work best in their area,” she says.

Committee member Alan Johnson agrees.

“We come to her with ideas and she says, “Yes, that sounds good,’ and gives us feedback. And then we run with it.” Says Johnson: “We do feel like we are responsible for making an impact.”

Like a virus, ownership seems to have been passed from one person to another. Each one ends up with the space to claim ownership of his or her own efforts.

The results are more than just a good feeling. They are a focus on the long term benefit of the employee owners and the company.

Johnson says that while some investors in public companies may care only about the short term—and might be willing to tolerate cutting staff or shuttering branches to achieve that goal—he feels ESOP companies are more focused on the long term and are more loyal to their employees. In turn, that helps him focus long term.

“Having the long term in mind means you can plant these little seeds. And if you stay with the company you can see those seeds grow and grow,” says Johnson. “You actually are empowered to make a difference, and you can see that difference unfold.”

He adds: “I know the reward for helping out the company as a whole is eventually going to come back to me.”

Clearly, Johnson has the employee ownership spirit bug—one he caught from Langhus and Kirby.

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